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The United Nations estimates that over 1 Billion people live in poverty around the world.
This week we are featuring a free website that gives a powerful and graphic look at extreme urban poverty. This resource is recommended for upper grades due to the sensitive nature of the topic.


The Places We Live is an interactive experience that begins with images of city slums and students can choose four different areas of the world to explore.


In each area, students are immersed in the daily life of the families that live in the selected area. Images come alive with audio clips. Take a virtual tour of different buildings or homes in each area. A related links section is available to view more resources about each area and poverty in general.

Think about the class discussion or project you could start with the image below:

If your students would like to learn more about poverty, specifically in North Carolina, here are a few good links to get them started:

Questions? Comments?
Please email me at: pamelabatchelor@johnston.k12.nc.us


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Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Wednesday Web Tool: The Places We Live - A Powerful Social Issues and Poverty Experience

The United Nations estimates that over 1 Billion people live in poverty around the world.
This week we are featuring a free website that gives a powerful and graphic look at extreme urban poverty. This resource is recommended for upper grades due to the sensitive nature of the topic.


The Places We Live is an interactive experience that begins with images of city slums and students can choose four different areas of the world to explore.


In each area, students are immersed in the daily life of the families that live in the selected area. Images come alive with audio clips. Take a virtual tour of different buildings or homes in each area. A related links section is available to view more resources about each area and poverty in general.

Think about the class discussion or project you could start with the image below:

If your students would like to learn more about poverty, specifically in North Carolina, here are a few good links to get them started:

Questions? Comments?
Please email me at: pamelabatchelor@johnston.k12.nc.us


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